Jante and The Involuntary Adviser

“It is better to listen to a string, which burst,
than never to span an arc.”
Verner von Heidenstam (Swedish poet), 1902, Invocation and Pledge

 

Jante verbalize the unwritten law that says that you can not stand up and think that you are better than others in some way. It’s a fictional law of a fictional Danish town in a novel by Aksel Sandemose in the book En flykting korsar sitt spår (A refugee crosses his tracks) (1933). The closest phenomenon in the English-speaking world is what is called The tall poppy syndrome.

 Jante
1  You shall not think you are something.
2  You shall not think you’re as good as we are.
3  You shall not think that you are wiser than we are.
4  You shall not fool yourself into thinking you’re better than us.
5  You shall not think that you know more than we do.
6  You shall not think that you are more important than we are.
7  You shall not think that you are good at anything.
8  You shall not laugh at us.
9  You shall not think that someone cares about you.
10 You shall not think that you can learn us anything.
Jante Criminal Code
11 Don’t you think we know something about you?

 

Commitment
Commitment can be dangerous as it can lead to knowledge that leads to the development leading to change. If those in charge do not control the course of events. They need control of change not to risk losing control of the situation – losing control over others, over money, over development. If you have influence and power you may want to keep it. That’s when you oppose those who get involved – rather than encourage, assist and perhaps cooperate.

 

Do nothing
If you don’t do anything you don’t risk standing out and you don’t risk falling into disfavor with those who want to have control. But you can never do anything good, increase knowledge and contribute to development.

 

Do something
If you do something you risk making mistakes. A mistake, may learn you important things. And you can get ideas about how to do instead. If you do something good and it’s new, you learn something new, and also others do that, perhaps leading development forward.

 

 

2008, varroa and viruses

In spring of 2008, I had been told not to give advice to beekeepers how to combat the varroa mite. This is because I allegedly gave dangerous advice that caused beekeepers to lose their bees. The one who told me this, I had been told treated against Varroa mites only once a year trickling with oxalic acid solution in November and calculated to have 30% winter losses.

Shortly afterwards a desperate beekeeper called me in late April. He actually sought someone else he could not get through to. He asked for advice on how he would do to save his eight colonies from dying as they all showed wingless bees in different amounts. It is considered by some that a bee colony showing wingless bees is doomed to die and can not be saved. So what should I do? I was told not to give advice. But should I tell the person seeking help to let the bees die, or should I give the best advice I could? Deny a needy help, I could not.

– The mildest treatment against the already by viruses weakened bees, are probably in this case Apistan, I said, but you may not want to use that. (The mites had just arrived there and built a population and Apistan had never been used before.)

– No, said the beekeeper from east central Sweden.

– To treat these highly viruses weakened bees with acid is to lead them into death, I said. Oxalic acid could possibly have been used in November, but only really if one earlier in July/August had checked the colonies concerning the amount of mites and treated with something then if needed, so they are not weakened when Oxalic treatment comes in November/December.

– Do you know what Apiguard is? I asked.

– No, he replied, and did not know what Thymol was either.

– The best advice I can give you is to get in touch with Joel Svensson’s Bee Equipements and ask them to help you get Apiguard. Read the packaging how to use it, and apply it as soon as you can. Thymol, I think is mildest for the bees in this case.

In September the same year the beekeeper called med and thanked me for I had helped him. All his bee colonies had survived, even the most affected and vulnerable. He had also made a few splits and wintered 13 colonies.

I asked him how long time Apiguard was in the hives.

– All summer, he replied.

– Huh, I cried, but did you harvest any honey then?

– Oh yeah, was the answer.

– But didn’t the honey taste thymol, I asked.

– No, he replied.

Hmm, could it be possible? Maybe yes, maybe no. Well, you should not and need not to use Apiguard as this beekeeper did. But the most positive thing with this beekeeper was that the colonies recovered and lived. And the honey was safe to eat whether it tasted thymol or not. It was probably mostly this beekeeper and his family who ate the honey that year I believe. He certainly hadn’t a bumper crop.

The bees pollinated and did what they should. And the beekeeper was happy.